Gould the median isnt the

None have trickled down to low-grade gliomas yet; they need to prove their worth with the high-grade bastards first. He builds emotion through the Mark Twain quotes and commenting on how statistics falls in the three species of mendacity.

Gould the median isnt the

That sounds like an enviable outcome to me. The first thing Gould appeals to in his essay is pathos. They apply only to a prescribed set of circumstances — in this case to survival with mesothelioma under conventional modes of treatment. Rather, he examined what this actually meant as a statistic and reasoned that living longer was not only a possibility, but he would have a better chance at it with a positive attitude. Of course, trying to keep an intellectual away from literature works about as well as recommending chastity to Homo sapiens I have to agree that my oncologist was similarly critical of me reading the primary literature. I read for a furious and nervous hour and concluded, with relief: damned good. There are many experimental treatments for brain tumors, and many look very promising. I had to place myself amidst the variation. If a little learning could ever be a dangerous thing, I had encountered a classic example. Damned good, indeed. He has spent years reading statistics for his work as a scientist in paleontology. Therefore, I looked at the mesothelioma statistics quite differently — and not only because I am an optimist who tends to see the doughnut instead of the hole, but primarily because I know that variation itself is the reality.

Hat tip to my good friend Meter who sent this gem to me. In support of this theory, I offer the examples of Ben Williams honorary biologist and Cheryl Broyles, two of my heroes in the long cold war against brain tumors. While many readers cannot relate to this attitude, it does help build the respect of the reader and maybe even an emotional connection.

When Gould describes his attitude after being diagnosed with cancer, it brings to life how objective of a person he really is.

stephen jay gould

When I learned about the eight-month median, my first intellectual reaction was: fine, half the people will live longer; now what are my chances of being in that half. Of course, trying to keep an intellectual away from literature works about as well as recommending chastity to Homo sapiens I have to agree that my oncologist was similarly critical of me reading the primary literature.

The median is the message

It was not hard for him to use ethos, or expertise, to prove his point. I was placed on an experimental protocol of treatment and, if fortune holds, will be in the first cohort of a new distribution with high median and a right tail extending to death by natural causes at advanced old age. Hat tip to my good friend Meter who sent this gem to me. It ruined my plans for the afternoon, you can be sure. Then my mind started to work again, thank goodness. To cut to the chase, he lived another 20 years instead, and proved to be one of the most influential intellectuals of the last century, even landing himself a small role on The Simpsons. When Gould describes his attitude after being diagnosed with cancer, it brings to life how objective of a person he really is. He builds emotion through the Mark Twain quotes and commenting on how statistics falls in the three species of mendacity. Variation is the hard reality, not a set of imperfect measures for a central tendency.

This helps the reader understand the point of view Gould holds on statistics.

Rated 8/10 based on 53 review
Download
"The median isn't the message". A homage to Stephen Jay Gould.